Thursday, December 31, 2015

38. From PCSO and the Phil.American Insurance Co.: A HAPPY NEW YEAR WELCOME!

PCSO NEW YEAR'S DRAW, 1965
What better way to welcome the New Year than to review the ads of two institutions that are in the business of securing our financial future?

The Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office's New Year lottery offering was the grand prize of P300,000--a munificent sum back in 1965, although still smaller than the half-a-million it gave away in its Christmas draw. PCSO was created in October 1934, and was approved by Pres. Manuel L. Quezon in 1935 to conduct lotteries to support charitable and social welfare causes.

PHIL-AMERICAN INSURANCE CORP., New Year Ad, 1959
Six years earlier, the Philippine American Insurance Companies which include Philamlife and Philamgen, greeted it clients with an an all-Filipino copy ad. Philamlife is still in existence today, and is regarded as the country’s premier life insurance company. Established on June 21, 1947 by Cornelius Vander Starr with Earl Carroll as founding president, Philamlife served as a “house of savings” to help Filipinos recover from the ravages of World War II.

Indeed, after all the merrymaking and the endless spending, isn't it time we think of the future? PCSO and Philamlife may yet hold the answer for your prosperous New Year!

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

37. '60s MEDIA NOCHE WITH COCOA RICOA


Who doesn't know COCOA RICOA? To a child growing up in the 60s, Cocoa Ricoa was the closest one could get to the original native Tsokolate de Batirol--only this one could be fixed in an instant. The taste may still be far off from the richer hand-whipped tsokolate made from real Spanish chocolate blocks, but at least one could have this cocoa drink every day! In fact, as this 50 year-old ad suggests, Cocoa Ricoa is perfect for the customary Media Noche to drive away the cold of the New Year's Eve!

COCOA RICOA, Xmas Recipe Ad, 1961

Cocoa Ricoa was a product of the Philippine Food Industries, Inc. which began operations in October 1956. It is credited for being the first entity in the Philippines to venture into cocoa and chocolate processing from its plant located at EDSA, Mandaluyong City. Today, it is part of the Commonwealth Foods conglomerate and continues to produce various cocoa and confectionery products under the umbrella brand name RICOA. 

May all your Media Noches be as heartwarming as a cup of Cocoa Ricoa!

Sunday, December 27, 2015

36. Christmas Promo: FREE MOVIES FROM DARI CREME!

FREE MOVIES IN DECEMBER--courtesy of Dari Creme. Print Ad from 1964.
 December--'tis the season for the Metro Manila Film Festival!! But two years before the MMFF was founded under the Manila mayor Antonio Villegas, Procter and Gamble's leading margarine brand--DARI CREME--was already promoting Philippine movies with its FREE MOVIES Christmas promo, launched in 1964.

A CHRISTMAS GIFT FROM DARI CREME--FREE MOVIES, ca. 1964
 All one had to do was collect the specially-marked Dari Creme "Santa Claus wrappers". Each wrapper was worth 10 centavos, and you can use these when you get a movie ticket at any of the participating first class movie houses listed on the ads (some of which have long gone out of business!). But one had to hurry--as the promo was only good from December 1, 1964 to January 7, 1965.

PREMIERE PRODUCTIONS INC. MOVIE AD, 1953.
Talking about Philippine movies, here's a related ad from Premiere Productions--1949 Producer of the Year--which announced its 1952 releases through its Christmas ad published on Literary Song-Movie Magazine in December 1951.

Thursday, December 24, 2015

35. MERRY CHRISTMAS FROM COKE AND PEPSI!

PEPSI XMAS AD, December 1961

Rival soda products, Pepsi Cola and Coca-Cola, send out their Christmas wishes to their customers in these full color print ads that  are surprisingly similar, though published four years apart. Indeed, competition knows no season! Maligayang Pasko, Merry Christmas everyone!

COKE XMAS AD, 1965

Tuesday, December 22, 2015

34. Our Noche Buena Hams: KING SUE, PIÑA & ROYAL HAMS

FEAST FOOD: Detail from a King Sue Christmas Print Ad, ca. 1961
Take your pick of your traditional feast food for Christmas! These ads—from well-known makers and distributors of hams and deli treats—bring memories of how special our past noche buenas were. Hams were often the centerpiece of our festive table—and such delicious choices we had!

KING SUE CHRISTMAS ADS, from 1961 and 1962.

 KING SUE was founded back in 1930 by Fookienese immigrant Cu Un Kay, who was tutored by a German national on the art of ham and meat processing. Thus was created the famous King Sue Hams. The bone-in Chinese ham with the familiar sailing ship brand logo, came wrapped in paper and secured with nets; they were to be King Sue’s flagship brand for years. Today, King Sue has other ham variants plus other deli products—from gourmet sausages, chorizo de bilbao, salami, pepperoni to Filipino favorites like sisig and tocino.

PIÑA HAM CHRISTMAS AD, CA. 1929
PIÑA HAMS were imported and distributed to the country during the Spanish and American Occupation period by Genato Commercial Corporation, a company that began its distribution business since the 1850s. The pineapple was a symbol of hospitality and this trademark was chosen for this sweet-cured which Filipinos prized. “Marca "Piña" hams were imported all the way from Australia (Hutton's "Pine-Apple Hams"), wrapped in cheesecloth. Because they were expensive, Piña Hams were sold also in portions, at the Escolta store of Vicente Genato.

ROYAL HAM, "Portrait of a Perfect Holiday Dinner", ca. 1953.
 In the 50s, ROYAL HAMS became a more affordable alternative to Piña Hams, as these were also sugar-cured, in the style of Piña Hams. The Royal brand not only included other meat products like frankfurters and chorizox---but also coffee, for after-media noche perk-ups.

ROYAL HAMS, "Family of Fine Foods", ca. 1958
Right after the Christmas Eve misa de gallo, the holiday feasting takes place—and only after the chocolate has been drunk and the ham and the trimmings finished—can the folks retire for the day, but not before wishing everyone: “Merry Christmas to all, and to all a goodnight!”

Sunday, December 20, 2015

33. DECK YOUR HOMES WITH A BELEN AND A CHRISTMAS TREE FROM PURICO!


A PREMIUM XMAS BELEN--FREE FROM PURICO! 1953

PURICO was the very first product manufactured by Philippine Manufacturing Company (PMC), which was later bought by Procter & Gamble. Purico , a cooking-frying-baking lardcame out in 1919 and was promoted extensively though field marketing, advertising and sales promotions. For Christmas 1953, Purico offered a full-color 3-dimensional cardboard Belen (nativity scene)  that one can have by presenting a boxtop flap plus 10 centavos. The pop-out belen set features cut-out figures and scenery-- "amazingly lifelike!", as the ad proclaimed.

SPARKLING XMAS TREE, FREE FROM PURICO. 1955.

In 1955, Purico launched another Christmas giveaway promo--this time a sparkling Christmas Tree offer--for just 1 Purico boxtop plus--25 centavos! (over 100% increase from their 1953 promo!). The cardboard Christmas Tree stands 12 inches and comes with 20 shiny ornaments. Like the Belen, the premium is available only by mail. 

Merry Christmas, from Purico!

Friday, December 18, 2015

32. Happiness Sold Here: TOY STORES OF OUR CHRISTMASES PAST

PUERTA DEL SOL AD, 1911
"Happiness sold here!"
Then, as now, Christmas came early for many Filipinos at the turn of the 20th century. As early as October, leading departments--many clustered along Escolta, Manila's premiere shopping street, came out with Christmas ads promoting all sorts of playthings--from pull toys, dolls and cast-metal mechanical toys.

LA PUERTA DEL SOL TOY AD, 1920s
Along with Estrella del Norte, LA PUERTA DEL SOL (The Door of the Sun)  was one of the more upscale department stores in Manila, carrying a vast selection of imported goods, including toys of the most wondrous variety. It was here that mothers shopped for foreign-made dolls for their precious little girls, of which La Puerta del Sol had the largest assortment in the city.

I.BECKS TOYLAND AD, ca.1930s.
In 1898, Isaac Beck founded American Bazaar, the first American-style department store which was renamed BECK'S when he moved the shop to 11-19 Escolta. Beck's proclaimed itself as the "Universal Supplier of the Philippines", a wholesale and retail shop that "sold everything". Certainly, the American toys it offered were the main attractions for Filipino kids during Christmas.

ROCES & CO, INC. PLAYTHING AD, 1929.
Nearby Plaza de Goiti in Sta. Cruz, is also a shopper's delight. The "heart of Manila" is home to many shops carrying toys and playthings--like ROCES & CO. Inc., which specialized in sports equipment for children. They sold everything from child-size tennis rackets, roller skates, baseball bats and even punching bags expressedly made for kids.  Today, the Plaza Goiti is known as Plaza Lacson, in honor of 1950s Manila mayor, Arsenic Lacson. The Roces Family were better known as builders of a successful media empire in the Philippines.

PECO AD, Graphic Magazine, 1929
Back in Escolta, the Philippine Educational Company (PECO) was put up by an enterprising Thomasite, Verne Miller, in  at the corner of Calle Tomas Pinpin, in a beaux arts structure known as Natividad Building.

PECO XMAS TOYLAND AD, 1955
The very popular pre-war bookstore sold books, stationery, novelty items--especially toys during the holiday season. PECO had a vast store space, occupying the whole 2nd floor. In 1929, for example, the second floor was converted into a "Children's Paradise" just for Christmas.

SHIRLEY TEMPLE DOLLS, at PECO, ca. 1950s.
PECO was rebuilt after the war and maintained a large warehouse-shop in Quiapo--on Castillejos St. In the 70s, PECO continued to operate in a large outlet on Oroquieta St., within Manila's busy university belt. It also opened a branch at the Makati Commercial Center in the 80s until other bookshops took over.

The shops where our parents and grandparents bought our toys and dolls may have long closed, but for many recipients of their gifts--the happy memories remain,



Tuesday, December 15, 2015

31. Xmas of 1965: CALTEX SHARE-A-TOY DRIVE


CALTEX began its presence in the Philippines way back in 1917 when local distributor Wise and Co. began marketing Texas Company products (or Texaco) locally. In 1921, Texaco opened its office in Binondo. A joint venture with Standard Oil Company of California resulted in a name change--CALTEX.  CALTEX started rebuilding its war damaged facilities in 1951 with the construction of the Caltex Refinery in Batangas. It was inaugurated in 1954 as the first petroleum refinery in the Philippines.

 In the 60s,  CALTEX was the country’s premier oil company--introducing revolutionary products like Boron gasoline. As a market leader, it invested in corporate promotions thru various community initiatives like the national search for Miss Caltex (1961), the Caltex Spelling Bee (1968) and its popular Christmas advocacy--Share-a-Toy Drive in 1965. (antedating Jollibee's "Ma-AGA ang Pasko" used toy distribution drive by over 35 years!)

SHARE-A-TOY DRIVE is a used toy collection project of Caltex with the aim of sharing the joy of Christmas with indigents. Caltex stations were used as drop-off centers for donated toys. Caltex even put up Caltex Toy Hospitals to repair damaged toys.

The project was supported by an animated TV commercial that featured a memorable jingle:

SHARE A TOY, SHARE A TOY
SHARE A TOY AND SPREAD MUCH JOY
FOR A GIRL, FOR A BOY
SHARE A TOY AND SPREAD MUCH JOY!

The collected toys were distributed to poor children on the Feast of the Three Kings (January 6), designated as the Share-A-Toy Distribution Day. This worthy project generated much national interest with millions supporting the call of Caltex to spread some  joy--for every child deserves to be happy--especially on this special day called Christmas!

Saturday, December 12, 2015

30. Where Are They Now?: KIKO, SHAIRA, JAMES, The Promil Kids of 1995

JAMES FLORES, KIKO GALURA AND SHAINA LUNA, 
the gifted prodigies featured in the 1995 Promil TVC that engaged millions of 
viewers with their  precociousness and knowledge beyond their years:
PIX: Philippine Daily Inquirer Lifestyle
In the 1995, one of the leading pre-school milk formulas of Wyeth Philippines—PROMIL—was launched using gifted children to illustrate the supportive benefits of a nutritious milk. Three child prodigies were chosen to appear in the commercial:  Kiko Galura, James Flores and Shaira Luna.

WATCH THE 1995 PROMIL 'TRIO' TVC

No more than 8 years old when the commercials were produced, the three kids each had a vignette that showed them at their exceptional best: Kiko reciting a poem in profound Filipino, James discussing the movements of the planets in the solar system, and little Shaira explaining aspects of the human anatomy.


Two decades after the memorable “Trio” commercial was launched and sold millions of Promil cans. Kiko, Shaira and James recently surfaced for a special Promil reunion that gave us great follow-up stories of their lives as adults. The Promil Kids continue to live up to their names as exceptionally gifted individuals who have found varying success in their chosen careers.
 
FRANCISCO "KIKO" GALURA, the poet in the Promil commercial, is
now a publisher of books and literary works, after a stint with an ad agency.
PIX: Philippine Daily Inquirer, Lifestyle
Kiko Galura remained true to his portrayal of a literary savant by finishing his communication course and becoming an advertising creative. Later, he joined the publishing industry and is now an accomplished publisher of poetry books, stories, essays and other literary works.
 
JAMES FLORES, the astronomy expert in the Promil commercial is working
hisway to earning a master in clinical psychology degree. He moonlights as a
music teacher and espouses and advocacy for gifted children like himself.
PIX:Philippine daily Inquirer, Lifestyle
James Flores, now 26, earned a Psychology degree and is now pursuing his master in clinical psychology, which he hopes to put in good use to help gifted children hone their talents and skills. On the side, he also teaches music.
 
SHAIRA LUNA, who discoursed on the human anatomy in the Promil ad is
 now a sought-after fashion photographer for  various lifestyle publications.
PIX: Philippine daily Inquirer, Lifestyle
Shaira Luna, now 28, parlayed his photography hobby into a successful career in fashion photography, a field where she is much sought after. Her stylish photographs have graced the glossy pages of premiere lifestyle magazines of the country.
 
KIKO, SHAIRA and JAMES, the Promil Kids, reunited.
The trio formerly known as Promil Kids whose achievements were celebrated in that commercial of twenty years ago,  have certainly lived up to expectations, “inspiring a new generation of giftedness”.  

 CREDITS & PICTURE SOURCES:
Gifted Children of the 90s: Where Are They Now? 
Nurturing Giftedness for a New Generation, 

Monday, December 7, 2015

29. Sweet Childhood Memories: WHITE RABBIT

WHITE RABBIT AD DETAIL. Early full color ads, 1962.

WHITE RABBIT was a brand of sweet toffee candy that was first produced in China in 1943 by ABC Company—which was based on an English milk candy formula. The first ABC milk candies were named ABC Mickey Mouse Sweets, and became immensely popular among kids. However, with 1950s socialist revolution in China, the western Mickey Mouse mascot was deemed politically incorrect.

The wrapper was redesigned with a White Rabbit against an artist's paint palette, with Chinese and English hand-lettering in a color scheme of red, blue and black against a white background. The new animal label—and the candy—became China’s leading candy and started to gain more patronage worldwide.

CANDYMAN PHILIPPINES, Malabon.
Picture: http://photos.wikimapia.org/p/00/01/20/10/02_big.jpg
In 1960, Candyman Inc. in Malabon Rizal—already a leading maker of Philippine candies—was granted the license to manufacture White Rabbit for the local market.

The butter toffee candies—which were harder than the Chinese version-- found favor among sweet-toothed Filipino children and White Rabbit was soon being advertised on print ads, along with other Candyman brands like Chokom and Super Kreem. White Rabbit, however was the lead brand in all its print ads. It became the candy brand of choice for many decades-an effective ‘pampaalis ng suya”, while in school or at play.

LEFT: A very early 1961 B&W Print Ad of WHITE RABBIT advertise with
Super Kreem and Chokum. The colored print ad dates from 1962
.

In July 2007, the Bureau of Food and Drugs Administration (BFAD) listed White Rabbit as among 4 Chinese brands recommended for recall due to their formalin and formaldehyde content. Although, scientific testing found the candy safe for eating, the local Philippine distributor of White Rabbit, Cheng Ban Yek & Company, bowed to the BFAD recall order.

Local manufacturer Candyman Philippines, on the other hand, contended that the White Rabbit produced here were formalin-free. The company even opened its factory doors to media to clarify reports about the BFAD pullout order.

1962 CANDYMAN Omnibus Ads, with White Rabbit as lead product.

 In 2009, White Rabbit was relaunched in China with a new brand name: Golden Rabbit, formulated with milk from Australia and New Zealand, instead of China.

Candyman Philippines continue to produce White Rabbit candies today, still loved by millions, after all these years.

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

28. The Many Extended Uses of SILVER SWAN SOY SAUCE

SILVER SWAN WITH MANGO..why not?
 What do you do to sustain interest in a soy sauce brand that's been No. 1 for years? Why, think of new ways to enjoy it! So, this "extended usage" print campaign for the popular brand Silver Swan Soy Sauce was cooked up by its ad agency and launched in 1970. The ad series featured suggested unusual pairings for Silver Swan and another food item--like mango and soy sauce. As the series progresses, the pairings become a bit weirder...and too much for my palate. But as they say...it's a matter of taste! What do you think?

SILVER SWAN with Pakwan. Hmmm. Really?

SILVER SWAN with Suman. Well, maybe.

SILVER SWAN with Leche Flan..this is just...unthinkable.Barf!.

Saturday, November 28, 2015

27. ZOOM-ZOOM SUPERSHELL: The 1st Philippine Ad To Earn a Clio Citation

ZOOM ZOOM SUPERSHELL, Launch Print Ad, late 1968.
 In 1969, J. Walter Thompson Philippines produced what could be the first all-music commercial for Shell’s new gasoline product that would create a stir in the local airwaves and beyond. The one-minute ad featured new talent discovery Carl Onrubia dancing to a lively and catchy “Zoom-Zoom Supershell” full song, interspersed with shots of racing champion Joey Bundalian, speeding in an F1 car.

“Zoom Zoom Supershell” carried the distinction as being the 1st Clio-cited  from the Philippines,  given at the CLIO Awards Presentation in New York,  during the 1970 American Television and Radio Commercials Festival.

It was cited for its contribution to the changing landscape of creative advertising landscape of the era, effectively using emotive elements for a gas ad campaign: “you car will feel like an F1 if you load up on Shell”.

Thirty three years years later, it was honored as one of the best 25 commercials of the Philippines aired over the last 25 years at the Pilipino Advertising Klasik Awards (PILAK)  in 2002 from the Association of Accredited Advertising Agencies of the Philippines.

POSTSCRIPT: The Onrubia Sisters--Ces and Carl-- were popular campus figures in the late 60s, They went to school in Maryknoll and were among the first female cheerleaders of the Ateneo basketball team. Cecille  "Ces"  Onrubia married banker Sonny Jacinto, while Camille "Carl" Onrubia is now Mrs. Cruz.

CREDITS:
AGENCY: J. Walter Thompson         /       CLIENT: Shell Phils.
Copywriter: Johnny Santos
Art Director: Senyong Atienza
Producer: Art de Guzman
Director: Tony Smith
Music: Polding Silos, Tiongco Brothers
Choreographer: Manny Zamora

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

26. Is That Who I Think He Is?: ALFIE ANIDO, for ROYCO

CONTINENTAL ROYCO BEEF & CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP, 1964.
Alfonso “Alfie” Anido (b. 30 Dec. 1959) was the son of Bert and Sarah Serrano Anido of Makati. The youngster’s cute mestizo features were apparent at an early age, so much so that he was cast to appear in a Royco Noodle Soup omnibus print ad in 1964, that featured the Chicken and Beef flavor variants.

Continental Royco Soups were produced by Philippine Refining Company, where Alfie’s father was a young executive. Touted as the “Philippine’s Favorite Soups”, the leading 1960s instant soup brand came in trademark foil pouches.

YOUNG ALFIE, age 5, already a professional advertising model.
Anido spenct his grade school at the Ateneo, where Pres. Pnoy Aquino was a batchmate. He was very much into sports, and qualified for the football varsity team. He also continued to appear in many TV commercials. Producers soon came knocking on Anido’s door.

He became a member of the Regal Babies, contract stars of Regal Films who made teen-oriented films. He found fame in the now-classic “Temptation Island” (1980) where he teamed up with Dina Bonnevie. His other films included Katorse, Waikiki (1980), Blue Jeans (1981) and The Diary of Cristina Gaston, released posthumously in 1982.

Model, Actor, 30 Dec. 1959- 30 December 1981.
His shooting death on 30 December 1981 at their Bel-Air home, which happened after an incident at his birthday party with  Katrina Ponce Enrile in Batangas, was reported as self-inflicted. Anido was just 22.  Rumors persisted for years about the alleged involvement of the Enriles but nothing has been proven. This 41-year old Royco print ad is a visual documentation of Anido's  budding showbiz career beginnings, which tragically ended early.

Sunday, November 22, 2015

25. Holy Aspirin! ST. JOSEPH or ST. ANTHONY?

ST. JOSEPH ASPIRIN FOR CHILDREN,  Print Ad, 1965
In the 60s, when kids got sick with fever and pain, parents turned to aspirin for quick relief. Two children’s brands were readily available at the local botica back then—carrying names of saints—perhaps for the holy men to intercede and hurry up the healing.

One was  America’s leading  brand, ST. JOSEPH ASPIRIN FOR CHILDREN. St. Joseph was already about 80 years old in the 60s, doctor-approved and trusted by mothers to give quick  and safe relief. It has a pleasant-tasting true orange flavor and a a creamy texture that children preferred. The aspirin brand may have gotten its name from its roots—St. Joseph; but others contend the brand was named after the patron saint of (among other things) families, children and the sick.

ST. ANTHONY ASPIRIN FOR CHILDREN, Print Ad, 1961
On the other hand, a local aspirin brand was developed and distributed by Metro Drug Corp. and gave it the name ST. ANTHONY FRUIT-FLAVORED ASPIRIN FOR CHILDREN. St. Anthony was invoked in recovering lost things, so maybe the product was so named for the easy recovery of children from fever and its discomforts. The ads harped on the three appealing flavors of the product: Orange, Pineapple and Strawberry.

Today, new medicine ingredients like acetaminophen and ibuprofen have been developed with better safety profiles. St. Joseph Aspirin, for awhile, disappeared from the market, but the brand (now 125 yearss old), still fondly remembered by millions of "baby boomers" as the medicine mom used to give for aches and pains has just been relaunched in America. At its reintroduction, June 12 was declared St. Joseph Aspirin Day!  As for St. Anthony Aspirin, the brand is no longer in existence.

Saturday, November 21, 2015

24. GINEBRA SAN MIGUEL. "Ang Inumin ng Tunay na Lalaki!"

1972 GINEBRA SAN MIGUEL "Inumin ng Tunay na Lalake" Ad
Perhaps, the most successful ad campaign ever launched to promote the highly popular  Ginebra San Miguel gin, was the “Inumin ng Tunay Na Lalaki” (Drink of the Real Man) that ran from the end of the 60s decade and which continued till the early 70s. 

Ginebra San Miguel was a drink full of history, first produced by the Ayala Distillery (Destileria y Licoreria de Ayala y Compañia), which was brought by La Tondeña in 1924. The distillery’s prized product was Ginebra San Miguel.

Its early advertising on print in the 1920s featured basic product information, harping on its customary use during important occasions. In the 50s, it capitalized on its “marka demonyo” monicker (its paper label illustrated by Fernando Amorsolo showed St. Michael with the Devil underfoot) and employed a devilish character to peddle the fun and pleasure the drink promised.

FROM TUNAY NA MAY LIGAYA TO TUNAY NA LALAKE

1968 "TUNAY NA LIGAYA" HEADLINE AD
It was in the 60s that Ginebra San Miguel started harping on values associated with product –the joy of drinking, good camaraderie and macho bonding. An ad series came out in 1968 with the headline “Tunay na May Ligaya”.

"INUMIN NG TUNAY NA LALAKE" Launch Ad, 1969

The next year, the line evolved into a campaign theme for the 1969 campaign—and this “Ang Inumin ng Tunay Na Lalaki” was born.The launch ad was a bit static—just a “cuatro cantos” trademark bottle pouring gin into a glass, with two men drinking in the background.

'TUNAY NA LALAKE", Camping Scene. 1969, B&W version
Subsequent executions were more dynamic—and several versions were made showing manly situations—from camping out to horseback riding,  and carabao racing--all done by an assortment of men--from sea captains to muscular Pagsanjan boat paddlers.

'INUMIN NG TUNAY NA LALAKE", Beach Barbecue, 1970
The television commercial showed vignettes of similar macho activities, overlayed with a catchy, repetitive jingle that became famous nationwide thru radio—“Ang inumin ng tunay na lalaki, ay Ginebra San Miguel, ay Ginebra San Miguel, ay Ginebra San Miguel ang inumin”.

'INUMIN NG TUNAY NA LALAKE", Horseback Riding, 1971
Ginebra San Miguel would have many more great campaigns and promotional gimmicks after that—from the Super Angels to the Barangay Ginebra campaign that also  generated a successful commercial jingle by Gary Granada (Pag Natatalo ang Ginebra), none as enduring and as widely appealing as its 1960s-70s  “Inumin Ng Tunay Na Lalaki”  campaign.


"INUMIN NG TUNAY NA LALAKE", Yacht, 1971

CREDITS:
AGENCY:  Philprom / CLIENT: La Tondena, Inc.