Tuesday, September 18, 2018

183. Brand Icon: WHITE CASTLE WHISKY GIRL, 1974

CARMI MARTIN, WHITE CASTLE GIRL, 1984-1986

One of the most unforgettable brand ambassadors for a product beginning in the 1970s was not your usual prim and proper college girl type (like Miss Magnolia), or your  fashionable ladies from high society  (like the Rustan’s VIP Council)—but rather a woman in a red bikini.

To make for a dramatic entrance, the WHITE CASTLE GIRL galloped into our TV living room astride a white horse, hair blowing in the wind, as the image of a castle loomed in the background. TV audience—especially male viewers—could not help but stayed glued to the screen as the strains of the catchy jingle, “White Castle, White Castle Whisky, White Castle Whisky ang bilhin”, followed her 30 sec. ride into the hearts of the drinking class. 

MR. JULIUS LIMPE
CEO, Destiliria Limtuaco
WHITE CASTLE 5 Years Old Whisky had always been a national favorite for many years, the product of Destileria Limtuaco, the country’s oldest distillery. The business was founded by 36 year old Amoy immigrant Lim Tua Co, who put up the distillery within 2 years of his arrival in the Chinese enclave of Binondo.  One of his earliest successes  is the medicinal wine, Sioktong.

Unfortunately, Lim Tua Co—who adopted the Christan name Bonifacio—died in 1887. So too, did his only son, Carlos, his heir apparent. A nephew, Lim Chay Seng took over the business in 1926, and shifted the production from Chinese drinks to Western spirits. Thus--WHITE CASTLE WHISKY came to be. It would become one of the company’s flagship brand, blended and aged to perfection in oak barrels, to give the whisky smooth, full-bodied taste, aroma and golden color.

WHITE CASTLE GIRL, EVANGELINE PASCUAL (1974)
Picture courtesy of: JOSE BENIGNO SALVADOR

The business flourished when his son, American-educated James Limpe took over the helm in 1937, a position which was passed on in 1958 to son Julius Limpe, a business graduate the University of Indiana. Julius became an expert blender of all sorts of liquor and spirit, which he patented and produced,  while steering Distileria Limtuaco to its pre-eminent position in the industry.

WHITE CASTLE GIRLS, AGNES RUSTIA (1975) & PEACHY VENERACION (1978)
SOURCE: www.limtuaco.com

To him also goes the credit for creating the imagery of the WHITE CASTLE GIRL. After all,  Mr. Julius Limpe was also an artist, so he also put his creativity to work in WHITE CASTLE WHISKY marketing and advertising. He conceived of a narrative that was fairy-tale like—a princess in a red bikini chanced upon a group of men while on a bareback ride on the beach astride her white horse.


WATCH "WHITE CASTLE WHISKY" CLASSIC 1978 TVC HERE:
(Source: ADman 1909,  Jul. 19, 2007)

To distract the men who had taken fancy on her, she brings out a bottle of WHITE CASTLE and drops it on the sand, diverting the men’s attention to the drink. The ruse worked and the princess in the red bikini rides safely back to her castle with a red turret. Sylvia Licauco had the honor of being the first White Castle Girl

WHITE CASTLE GIRL, TETCHIE AGBAYANI (1982). SOURCE: www.limtuaco.com

Along the way, the “princess” element was dropped, which, in a way was alright, as the first WHITE CASTLE GIRL to appear in a promotional material—i.e. calendar-- was a beauty royalty—Evangeline Pascual, Miss Republic of the Philippines 1974 and Miss World runner-up. It would seem that Miss RP automatically became a WHITE CASTLE GIRL, as in the case of Agnes Rustia and Peachy Veneracion.

WHITE CASTLE GIRL, LORNA TOLENTINO, 1982.
SOURCE/ Photo Credit: Jose Benigno Salvador

Two years before her Playboy splash, Visitacion “Tetchie” Agbayani reigned as the 1980 WHITE CASTLE GIRL. Even former child star, actress Lorna Tolentino, rode the bandwagon in 1982, at age 21.

WHITE CASTLE GIRL, CARMI MARTIN, 1984

The WHITE CASTLE GIRL exuded a sexier air with the casting of voluptuous Carmi Martin from 1984-86. From thereon, that bombshell mold was used in the selection process.

WHITE CASTLE GIRL,LYKA UGARTE, 1986. SOURCE: www.limtuaco.com

The pouty beauty Lyka Ugarte, was a perfect follow-up to Martinl she held the for 2 years. Star of ST (Sex Trip) movies Cristina Gonzales snuggled with the white horse in the 1992 calendar.  Glydel Mercado’s topless appearance in 1996. At the turn of the new millennium, the WHITE CASTLE GIRL started to look more provocative with her come-hither poses, as seen from the calendars of Angela Velez, who did several versions from 1999 to the first half of 2000s. The horse became an afterthought.

WHITE CASTLE GIRLS Glydel Mercado (1996) & Angela Velez (1999)
SOURCE: www.limtuaco.com

To drum up excitement, a nationwide search for a new WHITE CASTLE GIRL for 2007 was launched, resulting in the victory of beauty queen Gemma Gatdula. Her reign went awry when she was dethroned; she was replaced by former Wowwowee dancer, RR Enriquez. Current WHITE CASTLE GIRL is actress Meg Imperial.

WATCH WHITE CASTLE GIRL "LORNA TOLENTINO" TVC HERE:
(Source: Liquor Express, posted May 20, 2018)

"If it ain't broke, don't fix it".--this saying might as well apply to WHITE CASTLE advertising. Apparently, the campaign with the WHITE CASTLE GIRL continues to work, and thus endures to this day, give or take a few refreshments. After 4 decades, the girl in the red bikini continues to charge on her white steed, past the white castle with a red turret—as fast as the galloping sales of WHITE CASTLE WHISKY!



SOURCES:
WHITE CASTLE WHISKY CLASSIC PHILIPPINE TVC (1978): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQT4qU6mlT8, posted by ADman 1909,  Jul. 19, 2007.
LORNA TOLENTINO-WHITE CASTLE GIRL 1982, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=us4DAWw8Mws, posted by Liquor Express, May 20, 2018.
MANY THANKS TO MR. JOSE BENIGNO SALVADOR FOR THE USE OF HIS WHITE CASTLE PICTURES (Evangeline Pascual,Lorna Tolentino, White Castle paper label), PEP.PH  and MR. BORJ MENESES (for Gemma Gatdula's photo)

Monday, September 10, 2018

182. Skin Soaps for our Teen Years: DR. KAUFFMAN, NEKO, WONDER SOAP

HOW I SURVIVED TEEN-AGE ACNE. A trio of medicated soap essentials popular in the 60s through the 80s.


Then, as now, the pubescent and teen years are a period of great anxieties for young Filipinos. The age where his appearance becomes very important as his social circle expands, is also the time when acnes can begin. In the 60s and 70s, Filipino teens survived acnes and pimples by depending on affordable medicated soaps from the boticas—not, mind you,  on the expensive, imported anti-acne creams that were often hard to find.

DR. KAUFFMAN'S SULPHUR SOAP, 1960
DR. KAUFFMAN’S SULPHUR SOAP
For over a century, sulfur has been  employed by western dermatologists to treat a range of  skin conditions including scabies, warts, dermatitis, and of course, acne. Dr. Carl Ernst Kauffman was a Berlin University graduate who first concocted sulphur bitters and other derivatives in the 1830s. 

DR. KAUFFMAN's MEDICINAL SULPHUR SOAP, 1979

His inventions were discovered by druggists Aaron P. and Frank L. Ordway, who would use his formula to make Dr. Kauffman products. The Boston-based company moved to New York in 1896. Today, A. P. Ordway & Co. still manufactures DR. KAUFFMAN’S SULPHUR SOAP. Millions of teens have sworn by the efficacy of this traditional soap in its old-fashioned wrapper, and the iconic brand continues to be popular worldwide.

NEKO, very early Philippine ad, Graphic, 1929

NEKO SOAP
“The genuine germicidal soap” was available in the Philippines as an imported brand in the late 1920s, and was advertised in the leading publications of the day as an ant-deodorant. The NEKO brand is a trademark of Parke, Davis & Co, once America's oldest and largest drug maker. 

NEKO, HOSPITAL SOAP FOR THE HOME, 1986

It has since been acquired by Warner–Lambert in 1970, then bought by Pfizer in 2000. NEKO’s active ingredient is mercuric iodide, a disinfectant which helps stop rashes and acne (course, mercury is now banned in cosmetics). Today, NEKO contains Trichlorocarbanilide a powerful germicide, in combination with a high quality soap.
 
WONDER SOAP, 1979
WONDER SOAP
WONDER SOAP was developed way back in 1953 by doctor and medical researcher Jose Perez of Bulacan, who initially produced a whitening soap. But he further improved on the formula; aside from bleaching or whitening the skin,  it now also could  remove “ pimples, freckles, dandruff, scabies, itching, head lice(s), rashes, falling of hair, and shallow wrinkles”. 

WONDER SOAP, 1979

Thus, WONDER SOAP was born, which met a measure of success in the 70s, notwithstanding the petition of Crisanta Y. Gabriel to have the registration covering the trademark revoked, which she claimed she owned (the Supreme Court ruled in Perez’ favor). WONDER SOAP is distributed today by Philusa Corp. Its competitor is no less than C.Y. Gabriel.

SOURCES:
Dr. Kauffman’s Sulphur Soap:

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

181. It’s Here! America’s Newest Washing Discovery! BREEZE: The First Philippine Ads, 1962-1968

THE LAUNCH AD OF BREEZE 'Washes Doubly Clean". Magazine double-page spread. 1962

Philippine Refining Company (PRC), started as an oil milling business in the country as early as 1916, but it was only in 1927 that it was incorporated until it was acquired by Unilever Goup. 

1966 box
By the start of the 1960s, PRC had become a worthy competitor to Philippine Manufacturing Co. P&G, with a portfolio that included margarines, beauty soaps (Ever, Lux), shortening/cooking oils (White Band, Camia) and detergent bars, specifically the very popular Wheel. As one can see, all these products had competitive counterparts from PMC.

But when PMC launched the highly successful powdered detergent TIDE in 1957, PRC  was caught flat-footed and it took 5 years for the company to respond. But when it did, the product touted as America’s newest washing discovery—BREEZE—also took off and became a major player in the powdered laundry detergent segment.

BREEZE was actually launched in the U.S. market by the Lever Bros. in 1947 as a soapless, cleaning product. It was heavily supported with promotions and advertising, and became an established brand by the mid 1950s, so it was the perfect product to match to TIDE which had a hold on the powdered detergent market. The first ad appeared in 1962, which referred to the product as "America's newest washing discovery", in an age of colonial mentality.  TIDE, of course, was touted as "a sensational new washing discovery.")
 
BREEZE SUSTAINING AD, 1963
BREEZE was initially sold in pouches, and then in boxes. With its unique benefit—“BREEZE washes doubly clean—clean all over, clean all through”—the detergent’s dual promise, with a value-for-money undertone proved very appealing to Filipino housewives, and by 1963, it was drawing converts and new users by the thousands.
 
BREEZE "BANDWAGON" SUSTAINING AD, 1963
It is  accurate to say that TIDE and BREEZE grew the powdered detergent category in the Philippines, and both brands helped in popularizing a new detergent form that was looked at as more modern, more advanced, than detergent bars. It was one of the first brands to use music marketing; on radio, local singer Ruben Tagalog was hired to sing kundiman paeans to the art of  the wash.
 
DOUBLY CLEAN BREEZE AD, 1964
BREEZE consistently stuck to its “double clean” benefit, and further fortified this promise with the claim--“one soaping…one rinsing..no bleaching”.
 
THE ICONIC  HOUSEWIFE SNUGGLING TO BREEZE-WASHED SHEETS, 1965
In 1965, BREEZE ads began featuring an iconic outdoor shot of a woman with windblown hair, snuggled close to a bundle of clean, white sheets in her arms. The shot was meant to visualize “the fresh-air cleanness of clothes washed with BREEZE”.
 
NEW BREEZE, WITH INSTANT WASHING POWER, 1965
This picture would be used on the front panels of BREEZE boxes, as well as in its first relaunch since 1962. In 1966, BREEZE with New Instant Washing Power, was introduced. The new, improved BREEZE had quick-acting, power-packed suds that instantly work at once on stubborn stains and dirt. The results are clothese “so clean, you can even smell the freshness”.
 
FRESH-AIR CLEANNESS! 1966

This messaging would be used for the next two years, 1967-68. As a new decade dawned, PRC would go easy on BREEZE advertising, as by 1967, it was kept busy introducing its second laundry powdered detergent brand, the short-lived “RINSO”.
 
SMELL THE FRESHNESS. 1967
BREEZE would survive the rise of syndet (synthetic detergent) bars in the 1980s; today, BREEZE, (like its staunch competitor, TIDE), remains available in the Philippines, in powder and in the new liquid form, powered with ActiveBleach. The brand also continues to be advertised.

THE REAL TEST OF CLEANNESS. 1968
SOURCES:
Various Sunday Times Magazine issues
Then and Now, Magazine 1961, Philippine Refining Company, p. 27

Thursday, August 30, 2018

180. Battle of the Noodle Stars: Jun “Mr. ShooLi” Urbano's QUICKCHOW vs. Gary Lising's NISSIN’S RAMEN



Before, preparing noodle soups and dishes was a chore: one had to get fresh noodles or dry bihon from the market, cooked at home, garnished with vegetables and flavor-enriched with spices and condiments. You can also buy Royal Continental chicken noodles in packs (Royco), but they take awhile to cook. The other option was to buy from a suking mamihan or  panciteria.

The creation of the world’s first instant noodles in 1958 by Taiwanese-Japanese Momofuku Ando in Japan changed all that. His company, Nissin, invented a process of flash-frying noodles after they have been made, giving birth to the “instant noodles”. His first product was Chicken Ramen.

In many countries, including the Philippines, instant noodles in individual packs have become basic food items for almost all households—tasty, easy to prepare, and so affordable. But it would take decades before Japan’s best-selling noodles would be introduced to the Philippines.


At first, NISSIN’S RAMEN was imported from Japan, and then distributed in outlets –groceries and supermarkets—packed in their distinctive red (chicken) and blue (beef)  pouches with Japanese scripts. The flavorful NISSIN’S RAMEN became an instant hit among Filipinos, and by the 1980s, the brand was actively advertising in newspaers and magazine.

GARY LISING & NISSIN'S RAMEN, print ad, 1990.

The first NISSIN’S RAMEN ads that featured a celebrity were launched in 1987, starring the irrepressible Gary Lising, the “Bob Hope” of the Philippines, who helped popularized the American stand-up comedy style of entertainment. The Ateneo graduate wrote and performed his own (green) material in zany comedy show “Champoy” aired on Channel 9. Pretty soon, he was appearing in scores of movies (‘Wander Woman si Ako”, “Erpats Kung Forgets”, “Run Barbi Run”, etc.). Lising appeared as the main presenter of NISSIN'S RAMEN under the "Busog ka sa Sarap" campaign theme.

WATCH GARY LISING BACK ON STAGE HERE IN SHANG-RILA HERE:
uploaded by Herminio Mendiola

 The windfall success of NISSIN’S RAMEN prompted other companies to branch out to noodle production after realizing the potential of the noodle market. Lucky Me! was introduced in 1989 by biscuit company, Monde, and would give NISSIN’S RAMEN stiff competition. The next year, Semexco Marketing Corp., which already had a winner with its beverage, Zest-O Juice Drink,  joined the noodle bandwagon in 1990 with the launch of QUICKCHOW.

QUICKCHOW laid claim to being  “the first brand to introduce rice noodles”,  and made headway in the market, capturing the Southern Philippine market that propelled it to third place nationally.

QUICK CHOW & MR. SHOOLI, print ad, 1990

Helping push QUICKCHOW was the versatile JUN URBANO, who used his very popular “Mr. Shooli” character in the launch ads for the noodle brand in 1990. Urbano, the son of actor-director Manuel Conde, had his start in advertising as a hugely successful commercial director, megging many classic San Miguel Beer ads in the 80s.

WATCH MR. SHOOLI' s PERFORMANCE HERE:
Source: GMA Network

In 1985, he created and portrayed the character “Mr. Shoo-li” who first appeared  in “Not So Late Night with Edu”. His satirical political commentaries delivered in his signature Chinese accent became a certified TV hit. This led to his own talk show, “Mongolian Babecue”. In 1991, he even starred in a film, “Juan Tamad at Mr. Shooli: Mongolian Barbecue”.

Today, the noodle brands that Gary Lising and Jun Urbano endorsed are still going on strong. NISSIN’S partnered with URC in 1996  to form Nissin Universal Robina Corp. in the Philippines which now produces local NISSIN’S noodles, including cup noodles, yakisoba, and Payless. QUICKCHOW can still be enjoyed in these delicious varieties: palabok, pancit canton, toyomansi, guisado, La Paz batchoy. However, Lucky Me! ! is the undisputed no. 1 instant noodle brand in the country, which incidentally has also tied up with NISSIN to become Monde Nissin Corp.

As to Gary Lising and Jun Urbano, there is no competition beyond their product endorsements. They are, in fact, good friends,  who first met as Ateneo students in 1961. They worked together in films like “M.O.N.A.Y. (Misteyks obda neyson adres Yata) ni Mr. Shooli” (1991), and most recently in “Ibong Adarna” (2014), which Urbano directed. Lising had a health setback in 2009, but recovered and bounced with help from his colleagues in the industry,

SOURCES:
Nissin’s Food group website: https://www.nissin.com/en_jp/about/history/
Gary Lising: Wikipedia.com
Minde Nissin website: https://www.mondenissin.com/
Uncovering Jun Urbano, by Euden Valdez, 14 Jun. 2014:
MR. SHOOLI IS BACK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VP3ZP3TOktU, uploaded by GMA Network, Oct. 7, 2014.

GARY LISING BACK ON STAGE AT SHANGRILA EDSA, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMEb1jsNuic&t=13s,
posted by Herminio Mendiola, Published on Oct 24, 2012,

Sunday, August 26, 2018

179. Bad Hair, Behave! TANCHO TIQUE of Tancho Corp., 1962-1972

THE FIRST TANCHO ADS WERE FOR WOMEN! May 1962

When TANCHO CORPORATION barged into the hair grooming scene with its TANCHO TIQUE POMADE—little did it know that the “hair control stick” would make waves for its unique, convenient packaging. For decades, it would rule the men’s grooming products market, and its marketing highlights in the Philippines could fill a book with stories about how to develop a superior product, and back it with out-of-the box advertising and promotions.

SOURCE: amazon.com
The company itself began as Kintsuru Perfume Corporation, founded in 1927 by Shinpachiro Nishimura. Six years into its successful operations in Japan, it developed a line of hair grooming products under the brand name, TANCHO TIQUE.

From this line came the company’s first success—the TANCHO TIQUE Hair Control Stick, introduced in 1933. It proved to be a major hit among Japanese men, as it came in a tube with a cylindrical-shape pomade stick that you can directly apply like a gluestick,  to keep unruly hair in place.

The company undertook an ambitious international expansion, when in 1958 it reached a technical alliance with a Philippine partner to manufacture its TANCHO TIQUE products in the Philippines. 

TANCHO OMNIBUS AD, 1964
In 1959, the company changed its name to TANCHO CORPORATION, a name derived from ‘tancho’, the Japanese red-crowned crane, which became the brand icon. Surprisingly, the first TANCHO print ad that came out on Philippine publications was a 1962 color ad of TANCHO TIQUE Liquefied, for women.

WATCH TANCHO POMADE HAIR DRESSING PRODUCT HERE

At that time, liquid hair grooming products in liquid form were in vogue, like Vitalis, and Glo-Co Tonix. TANCHO TIQUE drew on its distinctive T-7 ingredient, a new botanical extract that gives unmatched vitality to hair.

TANCHO COLOR AD, with Soap. Note  Japanese models. 1966
The men’s line would be advertised some two years later in a TANCHO TIQUE omnibus ad which featured the TANCHO TIQUE Liquefied, TANCHO TIQUE (Soft Tique) pomade cream in a milk glass jar, and the TANCHO TIQUE (Solid Tique)  hair stick.  A soap would come in 1966. The print ad featured Japanese models.


VIC VARGAS, EARLY FILIPINO MODEL FOR TANCHO, 1968
It became apparent that the TANCHO TIQUE Hair Stick and the medicated TANCHO TIQUE soft tique in white jars would emerge as the sales drivers for the brand.

TANCHO CHRISTMAS AD, 1969

It was no wonder  that the 60s were a period of robust growth for TANCHO. There was an attempt to Filipinize the advertising in 1968 with the inclusion of Filipino male models—like the hunky Vic Vargas—in the print ad mix.

TANCHO TIQUE AD, 1969

By 1969, there were two variants of the Hair Stick (Medicated Tique, Vegetable Tique), while the TANCHO in jars had 4: Soft Tique, Lavender, Medicated and myCream. As hair grew longer, so did TANCHO sales.

There were cheap TANCHO TIQUE copycat brands like Toho Tique and Sinsu Tique which similar forms and packaging. But by then the advertising budget of the brand was increased to ward of potential TANCHO wannabes.

MEDICATED TANCHO GEL. 1970.

In the Martial Law years, TANCHO TIQUE  rode the “gel” hair product bandwagon that included the rising Dep styling gel, that projected a more youthful, Western image. TANCHO not only poured money for ad dedicated to TANCHO GEL in 1970, but also thought of ways to reach the younger segment of the market.

It employed two dancing sister who created signature dance moves that showed their vibrant, charming personalities—the nimble-footed Aldeguer Sisters.

Terry and Lally Aldeguer were already familiar to the TV audience in the late 60s and early 70s, but initially they were known for their Hawaiian and Tahitian dances.

TANCHO TIQUE contacted them to appear in their product commercials, introducing  a giant TANCHO TIQUE jar and stick,  via an energetic dance routine as the TANCHO jingle played, complete with their trademark  high kicks,  head flips, and dramatic expressions—mouth always agape with wide smiles.

The entertaining promotional spot was such a hit that they were soon being called “TANCHO TIQUE Girls”, paving the way for more guest spots on TV programs, corporate and dinners shows (they also learned to sing). Eventually, they would move to the U.S. to open a dance school where they would teach and stage shows for Filipinos abroad.

TANCHO MY CREAM WAS MEANT TO APPEAL TO A YOUNGER SET. 1971.

The year 1970 was also significant as TANCHO CORP.,  launched a new line of men’s products after realizing the untapped potential of the men’s hairdressing business. The product was “Mandom”, which was endorsed by the rugged Hollywood star, Charles Bronson. The successful launch  inspired TANCHO to change its name again, to Mandom Corporation, in 1971, in an effort to internationalize the products.

By the late 70s, it was apparent that the rise of the young, upwardly mobile market that would rule the 80s decade would result in a shift of taste for products more attuned to their lifestyle—cool, hip, modern. The marketing landscape had changed. The company launched Gatsby and Spalding brands, but these didn’t catch on. It tried direct sales, then reverted back to distributorship in the 80s
.
THE TANCHO MAN, 1972.
In 1992, Mandom Philippines Corp. was formed as a subsidiary of Mandom Corp. (Japan). It was tasked to work jointly with the mother company to develop localized marketing promotions, and to introduce the Philippines to the concept of distribution,  proven successful in many  countries. But by 1987, the subsidiary became wholly 100% Japanese owned. That put an end to the magnificent run of TANCHO TIQUE, and the image of a TANCHO Man—a winner, without a bad hair day every day!

TANCHO TIQUE products today are sold in giant retail store chains like SM, Cosmos Bazar, Watson’s, and are  also available via online orders. Perhaps, with the return of pompadours, flat top, crew cut, bouffant hairstyle among men these days, TANCHO TIQUE will rise again.

SOURCES:
ALDEGUER SISTERS, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8X1A-c7Bqc, uploaded by galdeguer, 14 Oct. 2009.
TANCHO PRODUCT SHOT: amazon.com

Monday, August 20, 2018

178. Brand Names that Became Everyday Pinoy Words #5: KLEENEX TISSUES

KLEENEX IS TISSUE, TISSUE IS KLEENEX. Early Philippine ad. 1953.

To many Filipinos growing up in the 1960s and 70s, facial tissue was KLEENEX and KLEENEX was facial tissue. But the soft, gentle tissue actually began as crepe paper that was developed by Kimberly-Clark as a filter for gas masks during the first World War. This absorbent paper was refined for use in the company’s first consumer product—Kotex feminine napkins in 1920.

VINTAGE KLEENEX,www.kleenex.co.uk/history
Next, the paper was made thinner, more supple and softer, and introduced a new tissue product called KLEENEX in 1924, because it was meant to remove cold cream on a woman’s face, leaving it clean. The –EX was appended so that the brand name will be aligned to the Kimberly-Clark family of products that already includes Kotex. In fact, the early ads of KLEENEX showed movie stars wiping off theatrical make up with the tissue.

But by 1926, consumers were finding new usage for KLEENEX Tissue—as alternative disposable handkerchiefs for blowing noses, and even some, as wipes for the toilet. Thus Kimberly-Clark had to address this larger market, introducing innovations through the years such as multi-ply, printed tissues, packaging novelties, scented/ unscented versions, quilted, large sizes.

SOFT..STRONG..KLEENEX. 1962

KLEENEX was introduced in the  country in the 1950s, and the first print ads appeared in local magazines in 1953. Kimberly-Clark Philippines Inc., which began its Philippine operations in 1964, took over the manufacture and manufacturing of its consumer products that include KLEENEX.  



MAN-SIZE KLEENEX TISSUES. 1966
By then, KLEENEX had gained top-of-mind awareness in the local market, just like in other countries where it was marketed. You would hear Filipinos asking for “KLEENEX!”at stores,  when they need tissues. Today, KLEENEX still enjoys a high brand awareness, even if cheaper, lower quality tissues abound in the market. Though not a market leader , KLEENEX is one of the top leading professional brands of Kimberly-Clark for enhancing health, hygiene and well-being.


DESIGNER KLEENEX, 1968
SOURCES:
The Kleenex Story: https://www.kleenex.co.uk/history/

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

177. Brand Stories: DARIGOLD MILK (1953-1976)


“Gusto ko ng gatas na DARIGOLD,
DARIGOLD, DARIGOLD!
Gusto ko ng gatas nA DARIGOLD,
DARIGOLD ang inyong bilhin!”

The most preferred and the largest-selling milk in the late 1950s was DARIGOLD Evaporated Filled Milk.  It was a staple milk product that one could readily find in Filipino homes, used in almost everything—for drinking, creaming, cooking and enriching halo-halo, leche flan and other dreamy desserts.

It became available in the Philippines through Consolidated Dairy Products Co. Inc., a giant and established dairy company based in Seattle, Washington. The DARIGOLD brand was appended to their milk products, including homogenized and pasteurized milk in bottles, milk powder and ice cream.

The first DARIGOLD ads appeared in the Philippines 1953, small black and white illustrated ads  featured in weekly magazines. In 1956, the Consolidated Dairy Products Co. formed a joint venture with Santiago Syjuco, Inc. to manufacture and  sell DARIGOLD in the country, hence the Consolidated Philippines, Inc. was established in Parañaque.

SO RICH AND SO GOOD. DARIGOLD, 1953

The Philippine company thus began producing the local tinned milk—DARIGOLD Evaporated Filled Milk—with the familiar 2 red-banded label with a blue diamond in the center representing the “seal of Darigold quality”.

LET YOUR CHILD DRINK DARIGOLD EVERY DAY, 1957

DARIGOLD Evaporated Milk was positioned as a family milk drink, enriched with usual Vitamins A&D and essential fats. Its marketing and promotions were uniquely engaging and distinctive.

MISS UNIVERSE, ARMI KUUSELA WITH CHILD, Darigold  Endorser from 1958-1961

DARIGOLD also had a long-running campaign that ran for over  3 years, thanks to to the pulling power of the celebrity mother the brand chose as its endorser-ambassador—Armi Kuusela-Hilario, Miss Universe of 1953, no less! She appeared along with her family, in a series of colored ads that saw print in leading publications from 1958 to 1961.

PHOTO ://www.pressreader.com/philippines/the-philippine-star

The brand’s most successful media initiative was the sponsorship of  "Jamboree", a segment within Student Canteen on Channel 9. The variety program,  hosted by Leila Benitez, Eddie Ilarde, and Bobby Ledesma, was already a certified hit when DARIGOLD sponsored the 30 minute game-and-contest segment that aired at 1:00 A.M., on weekdays. DARIGOLD JAMBOREE, as it was now known,  became a nationwide  sensation among the the growing TV audience beginning in 1961.


ACTRESS SHIRLEY GOROSPE for Darigold, 1959

DARIGOLD JAMBOREE went on a road tour, staging musical contests.  An alumnus of one such show in Naga produced a winner in the person of  future superstar Nora Aunor, with her rendition of “You and The Night and The Music”, a Sinatra standard. These provincial shows were also aired on local radio, thus expanding the reach of the popularity of the milk brand.

MOST PREFERRED...LARGEST SELLING...DARIGOLD. 1960
MORE, MORE, MORE..DARIGOLD GIVES YOU MORE! A popular jingle in the 60s

 Field promotions was also key to drive DARIGOLD growth. There were school promotions that were offered to students like wrapper redemptions, where one could exchange 5 paper labels of DARIGOLD for one specially-marked pencil. DARIGOLD’s arch rival, Liberty Milk, would spur the leading brand to further increase consumer satisfaction.

DARIGOLD CONDENSADA LAUNCH PRINT AD, 1966

In 1966, Dairy Export Company (Dexco), a subsidiary of Consolidated Dairy Products Co. Inc. of Seattle, got a license to do business in the country. It was from Dexco that  Consolidated Phils. purchased its sweetened condensed milk that was belatedly introduced in 1967 as DARIGOLD CONDENSADA. It was meant to fight off the advances made by Liberty Milk which had cornered the sweetened milk market category with their Liberty Condensed Milk brand.

WOW, DARIGOLD! 1964

But in January 1972, the Consolidated Dairy Products Co. Inc. of Seattle, informed Consolidated Phils. that Dexco, its subsidiary, would now be in charge of the control and licensing of the DARIGOLD trademark in Asia. Two years later, the American mother company offered Syjuco, Inc. to sell to them the interest of Consolidated Dairy products, Inc. in Consolidated Philippines. At that time, DARIGOLD was being run by 3 companies—Consolidated Phils., Standard Can Co., and Dexco—a set-up that the mother company alleged,  could jeopardize the Philippine business. The Syjucos refused the offer.

FOR DRINKING, FOR CREAMING, FOR COOKING & BAKING. 1966

Later in the year, Dexco pressured Syjuco Inc. by canceling its license to the use of  the DARIGOLD name, which was met with protest.  With bankruptcy imminent, Syjuco, Inc. chose to sell its 49% equity in Consolidated Phils. to the mother company in Seattle. Dexco took over the marketing of DARIGOLD even before Consolidated Phils. could be dissolved.

DARIGOLD IS BETTER FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY, 1966

However, the problem did not end there. The 1959 contract with Standard Can Co.--which stipulated that it would supply Consolidated Phils. with cans until 1981 – was cancelled in 1976. This prompted Standard  to demand reimbursement from Dexco and Consolidated Phils. for the separation pay of its employees affected due to the operation stoppage.

THE MILK TO RECOMMEND IS DARIGOLD, 1967

 Dexco said that it was not a party to the contract, while Consolidated Phils. claimed that its dissolution eliminated its obligation under the can supply contract. After claims and counterclaims, the Court of Appeals ruled and ordered Consolidated Dairy Products Company of Seattle and/or its alter ego Dexco, as well as Consolidated Philippines. Inc. to pay Standard. The decision was affirmed by the Supreme Court only in 1992.

After a long, and bitter legal battle, DARIGOLD's golden run came to a halt. Production was discontinued permanently in 1976, and Liberty filled the gap it created. Today, the once-favorite brand is but a footnote in the country’s dairy industry, remembered mostly because of its jingle that once rang loud and clear in all four corners of the Philippines—“Gusto ang gatas na DARIGOLD…DARIGOLD..DARIGOLD!”

SOURCES:
Pe, Roger. “What Happened To  Some Favorite Milk Brands?”, retrieved Oct. 20, 2011. http://business.inquirer.net/25973/what-happened-to-some-favorite-milk-brands
CONSOLIDATED DAIRY PRODUCTS CO., JESUS B. BITO and FEDERICO B. GUILAS, as Acting Trustees of CONSOLIDATED PHILIPPINES, INC. and DAIRY EXPORT CO., INC., petitioners, vs. THE COURT OF APPEALS and STANDARD INVESTMENT CORPORATION,

THE 1ST MISS UNIVERSE, ARMI KUUSELA- HILARIO, for DARIGOLD MILK, http://isamunangpatalastas.blogspot.com/2017/01/93-1st-miss-universe-armi-kuusela.html