Tuesday, January 14, 2020

261. CAMIA COOKING OIL of Philippine Refining Co., Print Ads 1957-1966

CAMIA COOKING OIL, New "No Spill" Pouring Spout, 1957 Ad.

CAMIA institutional size can, 1970s
Cooking shortening, oils and lards were household essentials in every Filipino home, so it is no surprise that many products crowded the market. P&G-Philippine manufacturing Co. (PMC)’s Purico, was of course, the established shortening brand after the War, but it also had Victor Manteca Vegetal and Venus  in the 50s and 60s. Not to be outdone, its rival Philippine Refining Co., (PRC) had its Whiteband brand.  Like PMC, PRC was into the development of coconut oil-based products.

Since PMC’s Purico’s leadership seemed unshakeable, PRC looked into  the arena of liquid cooking oils where only a few players where like Planta, Mayon and Baguio Oil. Towards the end of the 1950s, PRC began advertising its CAMIA Cooking Oil, a vegetable-based product that came in cans.

The name CAMIA, came from a specie of tuberous garden plants that bore white fragrant flowers, sometime called “butterfly flower”, for the shape of their blooms, or white ginger plant. Common in the Philippines, the white kamia flower stood for purity, and became a fitting brand name for its pure vegetable oil product.

Savor the Full Food Flavor! CAMIA OIL, Relaunch Ad, 1966
Surprisingly though, the first cans did not bear any picture of the CAMIA flower; only in 1960 that the cans sported the familiar white bloom on the front panel.

 CAMIA Cooking Oil was pushed through print advertising and sales promotions through the 60s and 70s, and became a worthy competitor to the leading oils of those days. Along the way, it introduced its institutional sizes, a  new “no spill” can, and more mdern can designs in 1966. CAMIA Cooking Oil  flourished until the 1980s, but could not quite catch up with the mass appeal of  Baguio Cooking Oil marketing.


Monday, January 6, 2020

260. THE END OF THE CHAMP: Jollibee's “BIG LANGHAP-SARAP” Burger, 1984-2019

THE LAUNCH AD OF JOLLIBEE CHAMP, 1984

In 1984, Jollibee launched its biggest challenge to knock-out McDonald’s big burgers led by its Big Mac and its Quarter Pounders. And so, the CHAMP became available that year in all stores—“the BIG Langhap-Sarap Burger” to match big appetites.

The CHAMP print ad showed the “anatomy” of this newest burger, that was packed and crammed with great taste—“sapin-sapin ang sarap”, as the copy proclaimed.

WATCH Jollibee CHAMP Extra Big 2008 TVC:

The ad pointed out that the  CHAMP was made with “hot and hungry size sesame bun, fresh and green lettuce, tangy, snappy pickles, a touch of creamy mayonnaise, ripe Baguio tomatoes, rich, thick catsup for taste, egg enriched 100% pure beef, soft and hot bun”.

The CHAMP became a big hit among Jollibee habitués , and for many years, had its own promotions and  TV advertising. For many years, CHAMP endured, and in 2009, even became extra-big when the patty was increased to 1/3 pound of 100% pure beef.

WATCH Jollibee CHAMP 2012 TVC 30s
featuring actor Mikael Daez in his first commercial:

Inexplicably, Jollibee stores were informed by the management through a memo circulated in early December that the CHAMP Burgers will no longer be sold, after the available stocks are used up.

Beginning January 1, 2020, CHAMP—and the also popular Big Burger Steak—were pulled out of the menu, leaving the double patty  Cheesy Deluxe Yumburger, as Jollibee’s biggest burger. There is no word yet if another big burger will replace the CHAMP, which, for nearly 2 decades was considered a “perfect match” to the hearty appetites of Filipinos.

CREDITS :
AD AGENCY: Publicis Jimenez Basic Advertising
CLIENT: Jollibee Corporation
 For the Champ/Mikael Daza TVC: 
CREATIVE DIRECTORS: Alex Castro
ART DIRECTOR: Joel Eudela
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE: Tobias Bernardo
PRODUCER: Noel Enriquez
FILM DIRECTOR: Stephen Ngo
PRODUCTION HOUSE: Pabrika

SOURCES:
Jollibee Champ Extra Big:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNMkBMSwDyM, Uploaded by SamantharoseLarryjoe, June 16, 2009.
Mikael Daez (Jollibee Champ) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kvzHB9_LVw, Uploaded by Mercator TV, Aug. 23, 2012

Wednesday, January 1, 2020

259. Send Your Cards Early: NATIONAL BOOK STORE and ALEMAR’S Christmas Cards, 1966-1978

ALEMAR'S CHRISTMAS AD, 1978

The Christmas Card tradition began in the United Kingdom when Henry Cole and artist John Horsely designed the first card in 1843, and sold them for a shilling each. 

PRINTED CALLING CARDS with Christmas sentiments, 1910s-20s
The practice caught on and the Americans introduced holiday card sending in the first decade of the 20th century However, the first  local cards were simply “tarjetas” or calling cards that featured the name of the sender and a simple one-line printed sentiment,

"REMEMBER YOUR FRIENDS ABROAD!", NBS X'mas Cards Ad, 1966

The first illustrated Christmas cards were imported and sold in bazaars and stationary shops in Manila. It was after the war that the practice of sending cards took off, as they became more available.

 
NATIONAL BOOK STORE CHRISTMAS CARDS, :Mura, Maganda,Kapuri-puri",  1966 Ad
In the 60s NATIONAL BOOK STORE (NBS)  and ALEMAR’s were the leading sellers of cards, especially of Christmas Cards. NBS started its own line of Christmas cards, and the most popular were those that carry native themes and scenic and historical spots like churches, mountains, waterfalls and historical buildings. It was only in 1974 that NBS got the Hallmark Card license, which led to the burgeoning of the greeting card business.

ALEMAR’s commercially printed cards under its own name, but it also carried Gibson Christmas cards that were popular I the 70s.

Today, the custom of mailing Christmas Cards is fast fading. Quickly taking their place are online greeting cards  that are animated or scored with music, are deemed more engaging and easier to send with just a click of a computer key—no need to go to the post office.  
 
ALEMAR'S GIBSON CARDS, 1975 Print Ad
On this spread are the seasonal ads ran by NBS and ALEMAR’s promoting their line of holiday greeting cards, to remind us of the days when sending Christmas Cards was the most thoughtful, tangible way to greet a loved one—with a pretty card that one can actually touch, read and re-reread again, and keep, as a reminder that “no one throws away memories”.

Monday, December 23, 2019

258. What’s For Noche Buena? PUREFOOD Christmas Ads ,1961-1979

PUREFOODS CHRISTMAS AD, 1965

PUREFOODS has a long history of bringing to the Filipino table, the finest food products especially for the Christmas season. 

THE STAR OF THE NOCHE BUENA FEAST, ca. 2013.
Though it is associated with meat products today, it also marketed brands in its early years like Hunt’s (pork & beans, tomato sauce)  and French’s (bottled mustard) and sold pickles, jams, and even soups under the PUREFOODS  name.
 
PUREFOODS GIFT BOX, 1961

But long before its Fiesta Ham became popular nationwide as the “Star of the Noche Buena”, PUREFOODS products have been pushed in its advertising as the perfect food ideas for the holiday season, as these vintage Christmas ads show.
 
PUREFOODS FIESTA HAM, 1979

Tuesday, December 17, 2019

257. HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM DEL MONTE, Christmas Ads, 1936-1967

DEL MONTE HOLIDAY AD, 1955

The DEL MONTE brand of canned and bottled food products has been around since 1886, and its history is intertwined with the pineapple industry in the Philippines. The named was used by a foods distributor that provided coffee to the Del Monte Hotel in California. The distributor used the same name to produce its canned peaches which were marketed by the California Fruit Canners Association (CFCA) in 1898, a group of  18 West Coast canning companies.

The Cannery of CFCA was built in 1907 and by 1909 was the largest fruit and vegetable cannery in the world. In 1917, it acquired pineapple farms and a cannery in Hawaii and added canneries in Florida and the Midwest, as well as in the U.S.-owned Philippines, in 1926.
 
DEL MONTE CHRISTMAS AD, ca. 1935-36.

The Philippine cannery, called Philpack, was headed by Harry White from 1926-1938, who steered it through start-up years. In Bukidnon, experimental plots were planted with pineapple crowns, until mechanical farming using U.S.-made tractors and trucks modernized the process.

Early DEL MONTE advertising featured products that were imported from the U.S.—cling peaches, cherries and fruit salad—all promoted during the holiday season from the late 1920s thru the ‘30s.
 
DEL MONTE CORPORATE CHRISTMAS Ad, 1961
The War closed down the Philippine cannery but was rebuilt soon after, using surviving pineapple crowns to restart the business anew. Slowly, but surely, the Company gained new packing lines.

It was in the 1950s that Philpack opens its Sales and Marketing offices in Intramuros, Manila, that resulted in more effective, and more professionally done advertising and promotions. Not only did the Cannery expand with a new can plant, but also was equipped with  new processing lines for tomato, papaya and tuna, and a seaport.
 
DEL MONTE PINEAPPLE JUICE, New Year Ad, 1965
By 1967, DEL MONTE products includes fruit juices, catsup, pineapples of different cuts, tomato sauce and even sardines, all actively advertised in magazines and dailies.

On this spread are an array of omnibus Christmas ads featuring DEL MONTE products  spanning the first 40 years of DEL MONTE in the Philippines.

DEL MONTE PINEAPPLE, Print Ad, 1967

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

256. MILO’s TRIBUTE TO SUPER ATHLETES, 1980



1980 was an Olympic year and to tide on the sporting craze, MILO—theOlympic Energy Drink-- launched its Free SUPER ATHLETES Promo. These were giveaway standing plastic athele figures given away with every tin of MILO.

There were 8 athletes to choose from—Gymnast, Shotputter, Football Player, Diver, Torch Bearer, Runner, Javelin Thrower and Weightlifter. They were available in Red, Blue, Green and Yellow Colors.
 
Photo used  with permission. Nicky Hernandez Collection
The SUPER ATHLETES can be collected for playing the MILO Super Sports Game. The gameboards could be clipped from selected magazines and newspapers.

However, there was a major boycott of the Moscow Games in 1980, as a potest for the Soviet invasion of Afghanstan. This resulted in the non-participation of major countries including U.S.A. and other western nations, and the organization of the alternative Goodwill Games. Similarly, in the next 1984 Olympics, the games were boycotted by Russia and the eastern bloc countries.


It is good to know that the 30th Southeast Asian Games in the Philippines, which is wrapping up this week,  continues to uphold the spirit of sportsmanship and friendly competition, untouched by politics and contentious politicians. Here’s to all the SUPER ATHLETES of the SEA Games!!


CREDITS:
Many Thanks to Nicky Hernandez for the use of his Super Athletes collection photo.

Friday, December 6, 2019

255. MORE SEA GAMES MEDALISTS IN A DOLE PRINT AD, 1984


1983 was a banner year for the Philippines at the SEA Games held in Singapore—and ace athletes like trackster Lydia de Vega, swimmer Christine Jacob, and Asia’s junior tennis champion, Felix Barrientos were in topnotch form (in 7 years, Barrientos will win gold at the SEA games). No wonder, DOLE Pineapple Juice contracted them, assembled a powerhouse cast that included PBA player, Abe King and tour of Luzon champion cyclist, Jose Sumalde,  for this color print ad.
********

FELIX BARRIENTOS, Tennis
SEA Games Achievements:
GOLD: Men’s single, 1991 SEA Games,Philippines
GOLD: Men’s doubles, 1991 SEA Games, Philippines
GOLD: Mixed Doubles, with 1993 SEA Games, Sinagpore
GOLD: Men’s team, 1993 SEA Games, Singapore


CHRISTINE JACOB, Swimming
SEA Games Achievements
BRONZE: 100 m. freestyle, 1981 SEA Games, Philippines
BRONZE: 4 x 100 m. freestyle, 1981 SEA Games, Philippines
GOLD: 100 m. backstroke, 1983 SEA Games,  Singapore
GOLD: 200 m. backstroke, 1983 SEA Games, Singapore
SILVER: 100 m. backstroke, 1985 SEA Games, Thailand
SILVER: 100 m. backstroke, 1985 SEA Games, Thailand
SILVER: 4 x 100 m. freetyle,1985 SEA Games, Thailand
BRONZE: 4 x 100 , medley relay, 1985 SEA Games, Thailand


LYDIA DE VEGA, Athletics

SEA Games Achievements:
GOLD: 200 m. dash, 1981 SEA Games (Philippines)
GOLD: 400 m., 1981 SEA Games, (Philippines)
GOLD: 200 m. dash, 1983 SEA Games, (Singapore)
GOLD: 100 meter dash, 1987 SEA Games (Indonesia)
GOLD: 200 meter dash, 1987 SEA Games (Indonesia)
GOLD: Long Jump, 1987 SEA Games (Indonesia)
GOLD: 100 meter dash, 1991 SEA Games (Philippines)
GOLD: 100 meter dash, 1993 SEA Games (Singapore)
GOLD:  200 meter dash, 1993 SEA Games (Singapore)