Sunday, July 16, 2017

119. Karapatdapat sa Paghanga: ROBIN HOOD POMADE, Print Ad, 1953

ROBIN HOOD POMADE/BRILLIANTINE. 1953

In the 50s, young Pinoy lads dabbed their hair with "brilliantine" pomade to create the pompadour look that was the rage of the era. Popularized by James Dean and Elvis, the iconic men's hairdo was completed with cowlick that was forced to curl in front of one's forehead with more dabs of pomade. Early brands included imported ones like Vitalis, Yardley and Brylcreem, but cheaper, local brands dominated the market from the late 40s-60s, like "Palikero", "X-7", "Verbena", "Le Conte" . One post-war brand, "ROBIN HOOD MEDICATED SOLID BRILLIANTINE POMADE" (in both cream and liquid brilliantine forms) attained a measure of popularity with young Pinoy lads of the era.

Created by Beauty Chemical Lab which had a plant along Benavidez St., Binondo in Manila, ROBIN HOOD caught on with the young crowd, favoring its extra-heavy brilliantine effect on hair.

The brand icon shows the bemoustached hero-outlaw who robbed the rich to help the poor---ROBIN HOOD--all in his red tights glory. Curiously, the package graphics show him wielding a sword instead of the bow and arrow that identifies him as an archer, first and foremost.

ROBIN HOOD Pomade was promoted nationally and advertising tin signs like this example were nailed in front of neighborhood stores to attract consumer attention. There were comics-like print ad versions written in deep, poetic Pilipino.

ROBIN HOOD, print ad 1953

Pomades went out of style in the 90s, with hair gels and clay taking their place. But in the distant 50s, there was nothing like ROBIN HOOD to groom you and bring out the the handsome rogue in you. Finally, as its advertising blurb proclaims---gleaming, shining, brilliant hair can now be "thrillingly yours!".

POSTSCRIPT: Sometime in 2012, a cache of vintage ROBIN HOOD pomade stocks as well as point-of-sale materials, mostly tin signs,  were discovered in a Binondo store. These were immediately snapped up by Filipino pickers and collectors.

Sunday, July 9, 2017

118. KENNY ROGERS ROASTERS: “Ordinary People, Extraordinary Goodness” Campaign, 1998


“Don’t forget the muffins!”
Who can forget that line delivered in a tiny, squeaky voice by a hunky male talent at the end of a 1997 KENNY ROGERS ROASTERS commercial? The dissonance in the character and his voice proved to be so memorable that the KENNY ROGERS commercial was soon being spoofed on TB gag shows,  even as a horde of customers began flocking the newest chicken restaurant in town.

KENNY ROGERS, ROBINSONS,
Source; wikimediacommons,
The concept of a chicken restaurant was not new back in the country back in the mid 1990s. KFC, the former Kentucky Fried Chicken, was already a dominant fastfood chain serving various chicken products. Enter KENNY ROGERS ROASTERS . Established in 1991 by country musician—and foodie-- Kenny Rogers, in partnership with John Y. Brown, and Kenny Rogers, it first opened its first branch in Coral Springs, Florida.

Just a mere four years later, Roasters Philippines Inc. brought the KENNY ROGERS ROASTERS to Manila. Roasters Phils., was founded by the enterprising Bernardine Sy, whose family was also behind successful consumer brands like Jag Jeans, Lee Jeans, Marie France. She expanded their business portfolio to include food—hence she ventured into franchising, acquired KENNY ROGERS and opened the first outlet at Alabang Town Center on 28 March 1995 to great acclaim.


Two years after, its first drive-thru restaurant opened in Lipa. Filipino customers took to enjoying roasted chicken (as opposed to fired) that they heartily ate along with side dishes, salads, pastas---and of course, the best-selling muffins.  


When it came to pushing KENNY ROGERS ROASTERS with advertising, the brand’s imported image came into play—and the first print ads showed slick product shots straight from an American magazine. If there was a barrier that needed to be broken, it was the high class image that the brand projected that needed fixing. After all, such an “uppity” image can be alienating.


By 1997, powerhouse agency Jimenez DMB&B was getting ready for the impending loss of KFC which it had been handling for over 2 years, due to managerial changes in the company. At that time, Jimenez DMB&B had been handling another Sy business—JAG Jeans—which was performing very well in the fashion market, thanks to the agency’s award-winning campaigns. The agency had long wanted the KENNY ROGERS account, but contractual obligations forbade it to handle conflicting accounts. KFC’s loss paved the way for the eventual addition of KENNY ROGERS to Jimenez DMB&B’s client list.

WATCH THE KENNY ROGERS "PILA" TVC HERE:

The first KENNY ROGERS ("Pila" TVC 30s) commercial produced by the agency addressed the image problem of the store by coming up with the “Ordinary People, Extraordinary Goodness” campaign. To show how accessible KENNY ROGERS is, the creative team headed by Raoul Panes and Poch Guevara came up with the idea of having “unseen people watchers”, observing the comings-and-goings inside a friendly KENNY ROGERS restaurant. Through this  peepshow approach, we see how the KENNY ROGERS crowd actually come from all walks of life, ordinary people like you and me—but with extraordinary taste for all that is good, that gives value for their money and that prices great eating experience.

WATCH KENNY ROGERS' "GANADO" TVC

Much of the charm of the commercial, directed by ace Vitt Romero,  relies on the lively, chatty voice-overs of the unseen voyeurs. They were, in fact, provided by the agency creative themselves, led by the Creative Director Raoul Panes, and Jim Battad, an art director. The one voice that stood out for was that of the good-looking hunk at the end, high-pitched and squeaky. It was voiced by Lilit Trinidad, also a creative writer of Jimenez DMB&B.

The new commercials were very well-received and Jimenez DMB&B would go on to produce a follow-up "Ganado" commercial using the same format. It would also keep KENNY ROGERS ROASTERS longer than KFC, which to this day, continues to offer its signature roasted dishes, cooked  on cooked together with the freshest ingredients in all their over 50 Kenny’s stores all over the Philippines.

CREDITS:
CLIENT: KENNY ROGERS ROASTERS, Roasters Philippines.
AGENCY: Jimenez DMB&B
CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Raoul Panes
ART DIRECTOR: Poch Guevara
ACCOUNT MANAGER; Arvin Sanchez
PRODUCER: Paul Suarez
VOICE-OVERS: Lilit Trinidad, Jim Battad, Raoul Panes
DIRECTOR: Vittorio Romero

SOURCES:

Sunday, July 2, 2017

117. Brand Icon: KFC’s “THE COLONEL” in Manila, ca. 1997.

COL. HARLAND SANDERS, Signed promotional photo. 1997

The Philippines welcome KENTUCKY FRIED CHICKEN in 1967, with many franchisees running their own stores. But the restaurant as we know it today came to be only on June 1994, when Manuel U. Agustines was awarded the sole franchise over the sale and distribution of Kentucky Fried Chicken products in the country. By then, its name had been shortened to just its initials—KFC!

COL. HARLAND SANDERS
https://waldina.com
The founder of KFC was the legendary Col. Harland Sanders (b. 9 Sep. 1890/16 Dec.1980). The portly, white haired, cane-wielding Colonel, dapper in his all-white suit and black string tie and bespectacled face, became such an icon that many people believed him to be a fictional character.

In reality, he was a real person from Indiana, who, in 1930 parlayed his love for cooking into a modest business, opening his restaurant—Sander’s—for travelers. 

Favorite on his menu was his fried chicken, cooked from his own secret recipe. That fried chicken would take his business to greater heights when he set up his own franchising business , which he called Kentucky Fried Chicken. The rest is history.
 
KFC LOGOS,. Source:https://logorealm.com/kfc-logo/
During his lifetime the likeness of the Colonel was a major promotional asset. In 1976, a survey ranked the Colonel as the world’s second most recognized celebrity. When he died in 1980, fictionalized Colonel Sanders have repeatedly appeared as a mascot in KFC's advertising and branding.

WATCH: THE COLONEL'S WAY 1994 TV 30s

This 1994 U.S. commercial features the American actor Henderson Forsythe as Col. Sanders.  

Surprisingly, KFC advertising in the Philippines during the 1990s, did not capitalize on the Col. Sanders character, but instead, focused on product features, using the trademark slogan "Finger-Lickin' Good".. In the late 1990s, “Col. Sanders” finally did visit Manila as part of the company’s promotional stunt and went on store trips, signing and giving away his photos and autographs.

WATCH: THE SEARCH FOR KFC's 
FIRST FILIPINO COLONEL AUDITIONS
Source: KFC PH youtube channel


It was only in May 2017 the search for the first KFC Filipino Colonel was launched, a move that would have made Col. Sanders proud. The finalists were all actors—Ronaldo Valdez, Leo Valdez and Pen Medina—and their audition videos created quite a buzz. The eventual honor of becoming the first Filipino Colonel went to Ronaldo Valdez. 

WATCH FIRST FILIPINO COLONEL
Source: KFC PH, youtube channel

SOURCES:
PHOTO SOURCES:
Col. Harlan Sanders Autographed Photo: Alex Castro Collection
All others, pls. refer to cited online sources below pictures.
VIDEO SOURCES:
Uploaded by HamptonRoadsTVFan, 2 Nov. 2010, 1994 KFC Commercial (Chicken -- The Colonel's Way).wmv
KFC PH:
THE SEARCH FOR THE 1ST KFC FILIPINO COLONEL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEbk6cylQBM
THE 1ST KFC FILIPINO COLONEL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MAZ2RgUL8X8