Friday, April 29, 2016

57, Shining Through: PHILIPPINE AIRLINES

THE BEAUTY OF THE PHILIPPINES. "Casa Manila Classic" Print Ad. Photography: Sandro Tucci, 1986.

Shining Through: PHILIPPINE AIRLINES

One of the most successful and enduring campaigns of Asia’s first airline—Philippine Airlines—was conceived in 1986 by the fledgling Avia Communications, an agency formed by SSC&B Lintas Manila and Avellana & Associates to handle the airline’s international advertising.

Watch PAL'S "SHINING THROUGH" Launch TV60s.

The result was the memorable and award-winning “Shining Through” campaign with a theme that reflected the different facets of Filipino character and the airline: warmth, serenity, charm, hospitality and jazziness. This was beautifull expressed in the music of the ads—“The beauty of the Philippines is shining through”.
WATCH PAL'S "Shining Through" TV 30s.

The campaign came at a time when local headlines were carrying news of Aquino’s assassination, communist insurgency and poverty, so the beautifully-crafted commercials, print and radio spots were a refreshing celebration of all things positive about the Philippines. “Shining Through” presented the Filipino culture in style  as opposed to the clichés of wild, rugged ethnicity.

While the concept, layouts and rough editings were done in the Philippines, the rest of the production—from sound recording to photography and post-production –were done abroad.  Foreign editors and directors were also employed. “The job is global, so we would like our outlook to be global”, explained the late Bobby C. Caballero, Avia’s Executive Creative Director.

SHINING THROUGH: BANAWE RICE TERRACES, Print ad, 1987.

When the “Shining Through” campaign was launched in 1986, it created a major sensation both here and abroad. The first was when its ads (both local and international versions) competed against the best at the 10th Philippine Advertising Congress and triumphed over multinational industry leaders by winning a record-breaking 24 Awards of Excellence. 

SHINING THROUGH: BEAUTY OF THE PHILIPPINES,Print ad, 1989.

In 1988, Avia won Best Poster Campaign at the Asean Tourism Forum and 4 awards at the Creative Guild’s Ad of the Year . The next year, , the still-running campaign bagged 3 Anvil Awards, and its print series “Casa Manila Classic” was adjudged Best Print Campaign at the 16th Asian Advertising Congress in Pakistan. “Shining Through” also reached the finals of the Clio Awards in New York for TV Advertising. The campaign was also written about in international magazines like Time, Newsweek, and Wall Street Journal.


WATCH PAL'S 2016 Miss U Pia Wutzbach
"Shining Through" TVC here:

Avia Communications has long been dissolved, but its “Shining Through” legacy endures; the campaign theme and jingle are still heard today, in all-new 2016 PAL commercials that continue to keep the travel and tourism in the Philippines flying high!


CREDITS:
AGENCY: AVIA COMMUNICATIONS
ADVERTISER: PHILIPPINE AIRLINES
EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Robert C. Caballero
CREATIVE DIRECTORS: Bogie Gallardo
COPYWRITER: Debbie Coloma, Bambina Olivares, Russell Jones
ART DIRECTOR: Janau Zaldarriaga
PRODUCER: Russell Jones
 ACCOUNTS: Tom Banguis Jr., Manny Gutierrez, Chinky Veloso

Source: de la Torre, Visitacion. ADVERTISING IN THE PHILIPPINES, its Historical, Cultural and Social Dimensions. Tower Book House, Manila. (c) 1989, pp. 124-127.

youtube Videos: Planefreak (uploaded 30 May 2006) / epneri1969 (uploaded 4 June 2012)

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

55. MILKMAID's "Grow Tall Little Man" TVC with NIÑO MUHLACH

"GROW TALL, LITTLE MAN..". A very young Nino Muhlach appears as a celebrity endorser for Milkmaid Condensed Milk. ca. mid 70s. Source: Dekada Collectibles.


MARCA SENORITA. Milkmaid ad, 1962.
Milkmaid is another old milk brand that was here in the Philippines as early as the 1920s, imported by Nestle & Anglo-Swiss Condensed Milk Co. 

Because the paper label featured a milkmaid in costume, it was often referred to as Señorita Milk (in the same way that another Nestle milk—Bear Brand—was known locally as Marca Oso).

 In 1955, Milkmaid was bought by Filipro Inc. which produced and marketed it locally.

Initially, Milkmaid print ads appeared on family and women’s magazines. 

When TV became an important medium in the ‘70s, Milkmaid found its talent in the person of the popular Boy Wonder of showbiz—the precocious and adorable Niño Muhlach (b.27 Oct. 1971).

THE BOY WONDER OF PHILIPPINE SHOWBIZ

Niño came from a showbiz family—his father, Alvaro Muhlach was the brother of Amalia Fuentes; her mother, Rebecca Rocha, was an occasional actress.

Smart, smart-alecky and talkative at an early age, Niño was first seen on TV trading repartees with variety show host Ariel Ureta. He was just 3 when he shot his first film, May Lalaki sa Ilalim ng Tulay. He would go on to make many more hits when his very own D’Wonder Films was put up by his enterprising parents.

WATCH NIÑO's MILKMAID TVC HERE: 

Filipro’s ad agency, Advertising and Marketing Associates, signed him up for a commercial that promised boys who had a “lot of growing to do”, to “grow tall” with Milkmaid. The commercial was shot in a day and really had no script—just little Niño doing his cute moves in a park—doing his exercises, jogging and martial art moves, plus some gratuitous Milkmaid drinking shots, of course.

Mother Rebecca even had a cameo role. Folk singer Gus Aldeguer provided the vocals and guitar accompaniment for the John Denver-ish jingle that tied all the scenes together.

As expected, Niño’s Milkmaid TV appearance created a lot of buzz. Alas, the jokes would come in years later after the boy wonder reached puberty—and stopped growing. 

A case of an overpromise? 

Maybe, but some wisecracks insist that Niño grew—or more accurately, expanded horizontally—so Milkmaid told the truth after all!

 http://push.abs-cbn.com/features/13096/nino-muhlach-the-child-wonder-is-now-a-good-father/

Monday, April 11, 2016

54. The Original CAMAY GIRL: PAQUITA ROCES-REVILLA

THE ORIGINAL IS STILL THE BEST. The legendary beauty, Paquita Roces-Revilla. in a Camay Ad.


Camay, the soap of the world’s most beautiful women, was created by the American manufacturing giant, Procter & Gamble (P&G) in 1926.

The soap—with its iconic cameo logo—was available in the Philippines as early as the 1930s thru the 40s-- imported all the way from the U.S.

Camay’s first advertising in Philippine publications were unimaginative illustrated ads that touted its superlative qualities—mildness, lather and fragrance.

CAMAY AD, 1940
And oh yes, even the woman featured in the ad was illustrated!

Fifteen years after Procter and Gamble (PMC) was founded in the Philippines, it introduced to Filipinas in 1950, its first cosmetic soap for the local market—Camay. 

This mild and gentle soap was not just made for women—but more specifically-- for beautiful women.

By the 50s, the face of Philippine advertising had become more sophisticated, with P&G products like Camay, launched through creative advertising campaigns.

At a time when most soap ads extolled the functional benefits of their product, Camay’s advertising appealed to a woman’s emotional need—to look and feel beautiful, that could only come from their soap’s luxurious pampering,

YOUNG PAQUITA, AGE 2
 Camay sought the most beautiful faces for their products who personified such qualities, and the first model they chose was the lovely Spanish-Filipina, Francisca “Paquita” Roces. 

Paquita belonged to the upper crust of Manila high society, newly married to a handsome movie star, Jose Goyena Revilla Jr. (aka Armando Goyena, “Kapita Kidlat”), himself, from an affluent and prominent clan. They had met at Sky Room along Taft Avenue, a favorite hang-out of society people in the 50s.

 Paquita modeled for Camay’s launch print ads beginning in 1952—and even after a bevy of movie stars like Tita Muñoz, Tessie Quintana, Gloria Romero, Norma Blancaflor, Rosa Rosal and Alicia Vergel were signed up as Camay beauties, the original Camay Girl with regal, patrician looks, appeared in ads throughout the 50s, introducing its many soap variants and promotions.

THE FACE THAT LAUNCHED SCORES OF OTHER CAMAY BEAUTIES.

 She retired from modelling in the 1960s to raise 8 children, 7 of whom are girls. Two of them eventually became Camay Girls in the 70s and 80s—eldest Maritess Revilla (..”ang lahat ay napapalingon..at napapalingon muli..”) and Rosie Revilla.

PAQUITA ROCES-REVILLA INTROS WHITE & PINK CAMAY. c.1955

For over 40 years, Camay was held its own against it main competitor, Lux. It was relaunched in the mid 1980s, with a new campaign—“for skin that faces the world”, and a new way of pronouncing its brand name.

WHICH BABY IS A CAMAY Gamay Promo ad. 1959. Sunday Times Magazine

 But in the late 80s. P&G shifted its manufacturing and marketing focus to other lucrative brands. Just when everybody thought that the soap’s rich history was over, P&G brought back a new, sexier Camay in 2015, with the new Romantique Rose Camay bath soap and shower gel. The ads featured actress Angelica Panganiban, who joined the scores of elite beauties known collectively to this day as Camay Girls. 


With first born Ma.Teresa revilla, future Camay Girl

 Still, people who grew up in the 50s still recall the original Camay Girl who started it all—Paquita Roces. After a storied career as a wife, mother and a beauty icon, Paquita died in 2001, after a lingering illness, at age 68.

PAQUITA'S DAUGHTERS: Maritess (70s Camay Girl, Mrs. Enrique Araneta), 
Tina (TV host, singer, (Mrs. Sergio Valencia), Cecile (Mrs. George Schulze), 
Pilar (Mrs. Bernard Palanca) , Rose (also Camay Girl),Malu and Cita (Yabut)
PHOTO SOURCE: the Beauty Book, by Doris Nuyda

Her husband, Armando, would live a ful decade more, passing away in 2011. They left behind a family of eight beautiful children and 29 grandchildren.

Monday, April 4, 2016

53. Promotional Premiums: COKE MINIATURE CASE AND MINI-COKE BOTTLES

MINI-COKE CASE FOR YOUR MINI-COKE BOTTLES. Print Ad, 1953.

One of the most popular promotions that Coca-Cola launched in the early 1950s was a redemption promo that allowed consumers to exchange specially-marked crowns for miniature Coke bottles--right down to their small crimped metal caps and contents. Later, a miniature wooden Coke case replica, was also offered that could accommodate 24 mini-bottles..

1951 COKE PRINT AD SHOWS AN ACTUAL-SIZE WOODEN COKE
CASE, "Drink Coca Cola in Botlles".. 
The promo was announced through print ads and point of sale materials. The copy goes:
FREE!  A Toy Novelty for 20 Marked Crowns

Here’s a welcome novelty for your miniature bottles. You can now get a Miniature Coca-Cola case by exchanging 20 marked crowns with any of your friendly Coca-Cola salesmen or at the Coca-Cola Bottling Plant.

THE ACTUAL COKE CASE AND BOTTLES REPLICA, ca. 1953.
Courtesy: Siglo Antiques and Collectibles

Keep on collecting marked crowns to own this attractive Miniature Coca-Cola Case. And remember, to fill the case , Miniature Bottles are still available for five marked crowns each. 5 marked crowns per miniature bottle.


Today, these vintahe miniatures are avidly being collected by Coke collectors and antique enthusiasts, souvenirs of the the those years when Coke refreshed everyone's thirst, whether big--or small!